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U.S. Bishops’ President Reflects on the 75th Anniversary of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Thu, 07/30/2020 - 10:06
U.S. Bishops’ President Reflects on the 75th Anniversary of Hiroshima and Nagasaki Brian Salamanca Thu, 07/30/2020 - 10:06 WASHINGTON – Archbishop José H. Gomez of Los Angeles and president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) issued the following statement on the 75th anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki: “This week we are observing the 75th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and August 9, 1945. “My brother bishops and I mourn with the Japanese people for the innocent lives that were taken and the generations that have continued to suffer the public health and environmental consequences of these tragic attacks. “On this solemn occasion, we join our voice with Pope Francis and call on our national and world leaders to persevere in their efforts to abolish these weapons of mass destruction, which threaten the existence of the human race and our planet. “We ask our Blessed Mother Mary, the Queen of Peace, to pray for the human family, and for each one of us. Remembering the violence and injustice of the past, may we commit ourselves to being peacemakers as Jesus Christ calls us to be. Let us always seek the path of peace and seek alternatives to the use of war as a way to settle differences between nations and peoples.”   The USCCB’s Committee on International Justice and Peace has produced resources for study, prayer, and action that the faithful may use in observing the August 6 and 9 anniversary, which may be found at: http://www.usccb.org/nuclear. ### Media Contacts: Chieko Noguchi or Miguel Guilarte 202-541-3200

USCCB President and Migration Committee Welcome Supreme Court Decision on DACA and Urge President to Uphold the Program

Thu, 06/18/2020 - 12:00
USCCB President and Migration Committee Welcome Supreme Court Decision on DACA and Urge President to Uphold the Program Brian Salamanca Thu, 06/18/2020 - 12:00 WASHINGTON—Today, the U.S. Supreme Court issued an opinion preventing the Trump Administration from terminating the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. On November 12, 2019, the Court heard the challenge to the Trump Administration’s DACA repeal efforts, in which U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) submitted an amicus curiae brief in support of maintaining the program. The DACA program was implemented in 2012 and has enabled approximately 800,000 young people, who paid a fee and submitted to a background check, the opportunity to work legally, access educational opportunities and not fear deportation. DACA recipients on average contribute over $42 billion annually to the U.S. economy. Archbishop José H. Gomez of Los Angeles and president of the USCCB and Bishop Mario E. Dorsonville, auxiliary bishop of Washington and chairman of the USCCB’ Committee on Migration issued the following statement: “We welcome the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision noting that the Trump Administration did not follow proper administrative procedures required to repeal the DACA program. “First, to DACA youth, through today’s decision and beyond, we will continue to accompany you and your families. You are a vital part of our Church and our community of faith. We are with you. “Next, we urge the President to strongly reconsider terminating DACA. Immigrant communities are really hurting now amidst COVID-19 and moving forward with this action needlessly places many families into further anxiety and chaos. In times of uncertainty, let us remember the teachings of the Gospel which encourage us to be open and receptive to those in need: ‘If someone who has worldly means sees a brother in need and refuses him compassion, how can the love of God remain in him?’ (1 John 3:17). In this moment, we must show compassion and mercy for the vulnerable.” “Lastly, we strongly encourage our U.S. Senators to immediately pass legislation that provides a path to citizenship for Dreamers. Permanent legislative protection that overcomes partisanship and puts the human dignity and future of Dreamers first is long overdue.” For more information and resources on DACA see https://justiceforimmigrants.org/what-we-are-working-on/immigration/daca-resource-page. ### Media Contacts: Chieko Noguchi or Miguel Guilarte 202-541-3200

President of U.S. Bishops’ Conference Issues Statement on Supreme Court Decision on Legal Definition of “Sex” in Civil Rights Law

Mon, 06/15/2020 - 12:00
President of U.S. Bishops’ Conference Issues Statement on Supreme Court Decision on Legal Definition of “Sex” in Civil Rights Law Brian Salamanca Mon, 06/15/2020 - 12:00 WASHINGTON — The president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), Archbishop José H. Gomez of Los Angeles, provided a statement on the decision issued today by the Supreme Court of the United States – combining Bostock v. Clayton County, Ga., Altitude Express v. Zarda, and R.G. & G.R. Harris Funeral Homes v. Equal Opportunity Employment Comm’n. The justices ruled that the prohibition on “sex” discrimination in employment in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 now prohibits discrimination based on “sexual orientation” and “transgender” status. Archbishop Gomez’s statement follows: "I am deeply concerned that the U.S. Supreme Court has effectively redefined the legal meaning of ‘sex’ in our nation’s civil rights law. This is an injustice that will have implications in many areas of life. By erasing the beautiful differences and complementary relationship between man and woman, we ignore the glory of God’s creation and harm the human family, the first building block of society. Our sex, whether we are male or female, is part of God’s plan for creation and for our lives. As Pope Francis has taught with such sensitivity, to live in the truth with God’s intended gifts in our lives requires that we receive our bodily and sexual identity with gratitude from our Creator. No one can find true happiness by pursuing a path that is contrary to God’s plan. Every human person is made in the image and likeness of God and, without exception, must be treated with dignity, compassion, and respect. Protecting our neighbors from unjust discrimination does not require redefining human nature. We pray that the Church, with the help of Mary, the Mother of God, will be able to continue her mission to bring Jesus Christ to every man and woman." On August 23, 2019, the USCCB, joined by other national religious organizations, filed amicus curiae briefs in the cases. They are available at http://www.usccb.org/about/general-counsel/amicus-briefs/upload/Bostock-8-23-19.pdf and http://www.usccb.org/about/general-counsel/amicus-briefs/upload/Harris-8-23-19.pdf. ### Media Contact: Chieko Noguchi 202-541-3200

Statement of U.S. Bishops’ President on George Floyd and the Protests in American Cities

Sun, 05/31/2020 - 12:00
Statement of U.S. Bishops’ President on George Floyd and the Protests in American Cities Brian Salamanca Sun, 05/31/2020 - 12:00 WASHINGTON – Archbishop José H. Gomez of Los Angeles and president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) has issued a statement on George Floyd and the protests in American cities that have taken place over the last several days. This follows the Friday statement from seven U.S. bishop chairmen of committees within the USCCB. Archbishop Gomez’s full statement follows: "The killing of George Floyd was senseless and brutal, a sin that cries out to heaven for justice. How is it possible that in America, a black man’s life can be taken from him while calls for help are not answered, and his killing is recorded as it happens? I am praying for George Floyd and his loved ones, and on behalf of my brother bishops, I share the outrage of the black community and those who stand with them in Minneapolis, Los Angeles, and across the country. The cruelty and violence he suffered does not reflect on the majority of good men and women in law enforcement, who carry out their duties with honor. We know that. And we trust that civil authorities will investigate his killing carefully and make sure those responsible are held accountable. We should all understand that the protests we are seeing in our cities reflect the justified frustration and anger of millions of our brothers and sisters who even today experience humiliation, indignity, and unequal opportunity only because of their race or the color of their skin. It should not be this way in America. Racism has been tolerated for far too long in our way of life. It is true what Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. said, that riots are the language of the unheard. We should be doing a lot of listening right now. This time, we should not fail to hear what people are saying through their pain. We need to finally root out the racial injustice that still infects too many areas of American society. But the violence of recent nights is self-destructive and self-defeating. Nothing is gained by violence and so much is lost. Let us keep our eyes on the prize of true and lasting change. Legitimate protests should not be exploited by persons who have different values and agendas. Burning and looting communities, ruining the livelihoods of our neighbors, does not advance the cause of racial equality and human dignity.   We should not let it be said that George Floyd died for no reason. We should honor the sacrifice of his life by removing racism and hate from our hearts and renewing our commitment to fulfill our nation’s sacred promise — to be a beloved community of life, liberty, and equality for all." ### Media Contact: Chieko Noguchi 202-541-3200  

Obispos Presidentes de Comités de la USCCB Condenan el Racismo y la Xenofobia en el Contexto de la Pandemia del Coronavirus

Tue, 05/05/2020 - 12:25

WASHINGTON— Al tiempo que hay más miedo y ansiedad debido a la pandemia originada por el virus COVID-19, también se han incrementado los reportes de incidentes de racismo y xenofobia contra estadounidenses de origen en las Islas de Asia y el Pacífico. El Arzobispo Nelson J. Pérez de Filadelfia y presidente del Comité de Diversidad Cultural en la Iglesia de la Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de Estados Unidos (USCCB), el Obispo Oscar A. Solis de Salt Lake City y presidente del Subcomité de Asuntos de las Islas de Asia y el Pacífico, y el Obispo Shelton Fabre, de Houma-Thibodaux y presidente del Comité Ad Hoc Contra el Racismo, emitieron una declaración expresando su profunda preocupación.

“La pandemia resultante del nuevo coronavirus continúa extendiéndose por todo el mundo, impactando nuestro comportamiento diario, prácticas, percepciones y la forma en que interactuamos entre nosotros. Si bien hemos sido alentados por los innumerables actos de caridad y valentía que han sido realizados por muchos, también nos hemos alarmados ante el aumento de los incidentes reportados de acoso y ataques verbales y físicos, particularmente contra los estadounidenses de ascendencia de las Islas de Asia y el Pacífico.

Mientras que un alto porcentaje de los asiático-americanos trabajan en el sector de la salud, arriesgando su propia salud para salvar vidas, algunos han experimentado el rechazo y solicitudes de personas que han pedido de ser tratadas 'por otra persona'. Mucho antes de que las ordenanzas estatales y locales detuvieran casi todos los sectores económicos en Estados Unidos, las comunidades de todo el país, desde Oakland en California hasta Nueva York, informaron una fuerte disminución en el patrocinio de las empresas propiedad y operadas por asiático-americanos. Estos son solo algunos ejemplos dolorosos del continuo hostigamiento y discriminación racial que sufren las personas de las Islas de Asia y el Pacífico y otros en nuestro país.

Como obispos católicos, encontramos estas acciones absolutamente inaceptables. Hacemos un llamado a los católicos, compañeros cristianos y a todas las personas de buena voluntad para que ayuden a detener todas las acciones y actitudes discriminatorias por motivos raciales, ya que son ataques contra la vida y la dignidad humana y son contrarios a los valores del Evangelio. Como escribimos en nuestra Carta Pastoral Open Wide Our Hearts (2018), el racismo es ‘un fracaso para reconocer a otra persona como un hermano o hermana, creado a imagen de Dios’.

Nuestros corazones están con todos aquellos que han sido víctimas de estas viles manifestaciones de racismo y xenofobia. Estos terribles sucesos son un recordatorio de que, en un entorno de mayor ansiedad y miedo, el perfil racial y la discriminación continúan afectando negativamente las vidas de ciertas poblaciones, lo que se suma al dolor y sufrimiento que ya ha causado la pandemia.

Los actos de violencia y discriminación recuerdan la larga historia de xenofobia y racismo en este país. Si no se discuten, podrían conducir nuevamente a una normalización de la violencia y el abuso contra grupos particulares. Sería una tragedia que Estados Unidos repita esta historia o que cualquier estadounidense actúe como si fuera apropiado hacerlo.

Más bien, la realidad de los tiempos y todo el sufrimiento causado por esta pandemia exigen una resolución más fuerte hacia la unidad, demostrada a través de actos de solidaridad, amabilidad y amor mutuo, para que podamos salir de esta crisis renovados y más fuertes como estadounidenses; un pueblo que valora cada vida humana, independientemente de su raza, origen étnico, género o afiliación religiosa.

Mientras que continuamos orando fervorosamente por el fin de la pandemia causada por el virus COVID-19, hacemos un llamado para el firme rechazo de estas categorizaciones o presunciones raciales, ataques verbales o insultos racistas y por el fin de todas las formas de violencia. Instamos a nuestros oficiales electos y a las instituciones públicas, así como a las figuras públicas, a que hagan todo lo que ellos puedan para promover y mantener la paz en nuestras comunidades. Y nosotros alentamos a todas las personas, familias y congregaciones a ayudar a promover una mayor apreciación y comprensión de los auténticos valores humanos y las contribuciones culturales aportadas por cada herencia racial en nuestro país".

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Palabras clave: Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de Estados Unidos, USCCB, Arzobispo Nelson J. Pérez, Comité de Diversidad Cultural en la Iglesia, Obispo Oscar Solis, Subcomité de Asuntos de las Islas de Asia y el Pacífico, Obispo Shelton Fabre, Comité Ad Hoc Contra el Racismo, Racismo, Xenofobia, COVID-19, asiático-americanos.  

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Contactos de prensa:
Chieko Noguchi o Miguel Guilarte
202-541-3200

 

Bishop Chairmen Condemn Racism and Xenophobia in the Context of the Coronavirus Pandemic

Tue, 05/05/2020 - 12:00
Bishop Chairmen Condemn Racism and Xenophobia in the Context of the Coronavirus Pandemic Brian Salamanca Tue, 05/05/2020 - 12:00 WASHINGTON – In the midst of fear and anxiety being fueled by the COVID-19 virus, there have been increased reports of incidents of racism and xenophobia against Americans of Asian and Pacific Island heritage. Archbishop Nelson J. Pérez of Philadelphia and chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ (USCCB) Committee for Cultural Diversity in the Church, Bishop Oscar A. Solis of Salt Lake City and chairman of the USCCB’s Subcommittee on Asian and Pacific Island Affairs, and Bishop Shelton Fabre of Houma-Thibodaux and chairman of the Ad Hoc Committee Against Racism have issued a statement expressing their deep concern. “The pandemic resulting from the new coronavirus continues to sweep across the world, impacting our everyday behavior, practices, perceptions, and the way we interact with one another. While we have been heartened by the countless acts of charity and bravery that have been modeled by many, we are also alarmed to note the increase in reported incidents of bullying and verbal and physical assaults, particularly against Americans of Asian and Pacific Island heritage. “While a high percentage of Asian Americans work in the health care sector risking their own health to save lives, some have experienced rejection and requests to be treated ‘by someone else.’ Way before state and local ordinances brought to a halt almost every economic sector in the country, communities across the country, from Oakland, California to New York City, reported a sharp decline in the patronage for businesses owned and operated by Asian Americans. These are only a few painful examples of the continuing harassment and racial discrimination suffered by people of Asian and Pacific Islanders and others in our country. “As Catholic bishops, we find these actions absolutely unacceptable. We call on Catholics, fellow Christians and all people of good will to help stop all racially motivated discriminatory actions and attitudes, for they are attacks against human life and dignity and are contrary to Gospel values. As we wrote in our pastoral letter Open Wide Our Hearts (2018), racism is ‘a failure to acknowledge another person as a brother or sister, created in the image of God.’ “Our hearts go out to all those who have been victims of these vile displays of racism and xenophobia. These dreadful occurrences are a reminder that, in an environment of increased anxiety and fear, racial profiling and discrimination continue to negatively impact the lives of certain populations, adding to the pain and suffering already caused by the pandemic. “The acts of violence and unjust discrimination evoke and prod a long history of xenophobia and racism in this country. If uncontested, they could lead once again to a normalization of violence and abuse against particular groups. It would be a tragedy for the United States to repeat this history or for any American to act as if it is appropriate to do so. “Rather, the reality of the times and all the suffering caused by this pandemic call for a stronger resolve towards unity, demonstrated through acts of solidarity, kindness and love toward one another, so that we can emerge from this crisis renewed and stronger as one American people; a people that places value in every human life, regardless of race, ethnic origin, gender or religious affiliation. “While we continue to pray fervently for an end to the pandemic caused by the COVID-19 virus, we call for a firm rejection of racial categorizations or presumptions, racially based verbal assaults or slurs, and for an end to all forms of violence. We ask our elected officials and public institutions, as well as all public figures, to do all that they can to promote and maintain peace in our communities; and we encourage all individuals, families and congregations to assist in promoting a greater appreciation and understanding of the authentic human values and cultural contributions brought by each racial heritage in our country.” ### Media Contacts: Chieko Noguchi or Miguel Guilarte 202-541-3200  

Bishops Tasked with the Pastoral Care of Migrants Issue Statement in Support of Migrant Farmworkers During the Coronavirus Pandemic

Tue, 04/28/2020 - 12:00
Bishops Tasked with the Pastoral Care of Migrants Issue Statement in Support of Migrant Farmworkers During the Coronavirus Pandemic Brian Salamanca Tue, 04/28/2020 - 12:00 WASHINGTON— “We urge our political leaders and policymakers to consider the realities and emerging, pressing needs of the farmworker communities across the country during this time of the coronavirus outbreak. To defeat the virus, no one must be left out,” said a group of four U.S. bishops tasked with the pastoral care of migrant populations. The bishops put forth a statement in support of migrant farmworkers during the pandemic caused by the COVID-19 virus. Archbishop Nelson J. Pérez of Philadelphia and chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ (USCCB) Committee on Cultural Diversity in the Church, Bishop Joseph J. Tyson of Yakima, chairman of the Subcommittee on Pastoral Care of Migrants, Refugees and Travelers (PCMRT), Bishop Oscar Cantú of San Jose and PCMRT’s episcopal liaison for migrant farmworker ministry, and Bishop Mario E. Dorsonville, auxiliary bishop of Washington and chairman of the Committee on Migration. The statement of the four bishops follows: “The coronavirus has changed life for most of the planet, as billions of people experience social isolation and quarantine. Here in the United States, it is estimated that close to 95% of Americans have been impacted by some form of stay-at-home order. For those who are under such stay-at-home mandates, we thank you for doing your part in following the guidelines of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and social distancing recommendations of your dioceses, state, and local governments to curb the spread of this pandemic. We would like to express our sincere gratitude and prayers for the many essential workers throughout the country, helping us receive our medicines, groceries, and other fundamental needs during this difficult time. We would like to highlight the reality of migrant farmworker communities and honor their heroic role amidst the many challenges they face during this crisis. More than a million farmworkers across the United States are regarded as essential workers, critical to keeping the nation fed during this pandemic. The U.S. Department of Labor estimates that roughly half of these farmworkers are undocumented, while other observers suggest figures to be much higher. Like so many mobile and itinerant populations, undocumented migrant farmworkers are particularly vulnerable to the impact of the coronavirus outbreak. Many migrant farmworkers lack access to health insurance, medical treatment, and sick or paid leave options; farmworker housing conditions are often overcrowded with little opportunity for social distancing, including transportation to and from work, and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is not always available. Additionally, conditions of their immigration visas can make them unwilling or unable to speak out about a need for protection due to the threat of losing their job. Along with these challenges to healthcare access and community mitigation during the outbreak are economic consequences of the pandemic that are having devastating effects on these communities. With disruption and layoffs due to the COVID-19 virus, many farmworkers are finding themselves without income for their families for the foreseeable future, and others who would otherwise stay at home for health concerns are risking going to work during this time as essential workers. Childcare for families with school closures is another area of related concern, as families may be at a loss for affordable, viable, safe childcare options. The realities of financial instability, increased stress, and anxiety during this time may also contribute to an increase in cases of domestic violence and labor exploitation. Add to these many challenges the fear of immigration enforcement action which may deter someone from seeking necessary medical attention or speaking up about forms of abuses at home or the workplace that occur during this time. Because of these many, grave concerns for this community, we urge our political leaders and policymakers to consider the realities and emerging, pressing needs of the farmworker communities across the country during this time of the coronavirus outbreak. To defeat the virus, no one must be left out. The COVID-19 virus teaches us we are one human family, says the Holy Father. ‘We can only get out of this situation together, as a whole humanity.’ Despite these concerns, there are signs of hope in the agriculture industry across the nation. Many growers and farmers are doing everything possible to protect their workers and ensure awareness and social distancing guidelines and measures are communicated and implemented. We extend our sincere gratitude to these businesses and implore that this trend is executed across the country for the basic protection, safety, and wellbeing of all farmworkers and their families. We offer the following recommendations: • Recognize that all workers need access to free testing and care related to the COVID-19 virus • Ensure that all housing and transportation for farmworkers complies with current CDC guidelines • Provide information on proper health and hygiene that is easily accessible in multiple languages and infographics for illiterate workers • Ensure access to proper hygiene and safety protections at work sites, including hand washing facilities/stations, and masks and/or other PPE • Have an emergency health plan in place to ensure care and protocols when a worker contracts the COVID-19 virus; and • Honor the dignity of the work of farmworkers and make sure that they are paid a livable wage as well as be eligible for other benefits to help protect their health and the health and safety of their families at this time. We pray for all farmworkers facing difficulties and challenges related to or exacerbated by the COVID-19 virus. We pray for their protection and safety as they provide for the needs of the country; we pray for all workers currently unemployed, that the Lord will accompany them and see them through. During this challenging time, it is good to remember the words of St. John Paul II: ‘We are an Easter people, and Alleluia is our song.’ May the risen Lord send His peace and grace to be with you and your families. We turn to Our Lady of Guadalupe, asking for her intercession and maternal protection for the end to the coronavirus.” ### Media Contacts: Chieko Noguchi or Miguel Guilarte 202-541-3200

Obispos Encargados del Cuidado Pastoral de los Migrantes Emiten una Declaración en Apoyo de los Trabajadores Agrícolas Migrantes Durante la Pandemia de Coronavirus

Tue, 04/28/2020 - 11:33

WASHINGTON— “Instamos a nuestros líderes políticos y legisladores a considerar las realidades y las necesidades emergentes y apremiantes de las comunidades de trabajadores agrícolas en todo el país durante este tiempo del brote de coronavirus. Para vencer al virus, nadie debe quedar excluido", dijeron cuatro obispos de Estados Unidos encargados del cuidado pastoral de las poblaciones migrantes.

Los obispos emitieron una declaración en apoyo de los trabajadores agrícolas migrantes durante la pandemia causada por el virus COVID-19. El Arzobispo Nelson J. Pérez de Filadelfia y presidente del Comité de Diversidad Cultural en la Iglesia de la Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de los Estados Unidos (USCCB), el Obispo Joseph J. Tyson de Yakima, presidente del Subcomité de Cuidado Pastoral de Migrantes, Refugiados y Viajeros ( PCMRT), el obispo Oscar Cantú de San José y enlace episcopal de PCMRT para el ministerio de trabajadores agrícolas migrantes, y el obispo Mario E. Dorsonville, obispo auxiliar de Washington y presidente del Comité de Migración.

El comunicado de los cuatro obispos es el siguiente:

“El coronavirus ha cambiado la vida de la mayor parte de las personas del planeta, ya que miles de millones experimentan aislamiento social y cuarentena. Aquí en Estados Unidos, se estima que cerca del 95% de los estadounidenses se han visto afectados por las regulaciones de permanecer en casa. Para aquellos que se encuentran bajo tales mandatos de quedarse en casa, les agradecemos por cumplir con las directrices de los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades (CDC, por sus siglas en inglés) y las recomendaciones de distanciamiento social de sus diócesis, gobiernos estatales y locales para frenar la propagación de esta pandemia

Queremos expresar nuestra sincera gratitud y oraciones por los muchos trabajadores esenciales en todo el país, ayudándonos a recibir nuestros medicamentos, alimentos y a satisfacer otras necesidades fundamentales durante este momento difícil. Nos gustaría resaltar la realidad de las comunidades de trabajadores agrícolas migrantes y honrar su papel heroico en medio de los muchos desafíos que enfrentan durante esta crisis.

Más de un millón de trabajadores agrícolas en los Estados Unidos son considerados trabajadores esenciales, críticos para mantener a la nación alimentada durante esta pandemia. El Departamento de Trabajo de los Estados Unidos estima que aproximadamente la mitad de estos trabajadores agrícolas son indocumentados, mientras que otros observadores sugieren que las cifras son mucho más altas. Al igual que muchas poblaciones móviles e itinerantes, los trabajadores agrícolas migrantes indocumentados son particularmente vulnerables al impacto del brote de coronavirus. Muchos trabajadores agrícolas migrantes carecen de acceso a seguro de salud, tratamiento médico y opciones de permisos por enfermedad o remunerados; las modalidades de vivienda de los trabajadores agrícolas a menudo están superpobladas con pocas oportunidades de distanciamiento social, incluido el transporte hacia y desde el trabajo, y el Equipo de Protección Personal (PPE, por sus siglas en inglés) no siempre está disponible. Además, las condiciones de sus visas de inmigración pueden hacer que no quieran o no puedan hablar sobre la necesidad de protección debido a la amenaza de perder su trabajo.

Junto con estos desafíos para el acceso a la atención médica y efectos sobre la comunidad durante esta crisis de salud, hay consecuencias económicas de la pandemia que están teniendo efectos devastadores en estas comunidades. Con la interrupción y los despidos debido al virus COVID-19, muchos trabajadores agrícolas se encuentran sin ingresos para proveer a sus familias en el futuro inmediato, y otros que de lo contrario se quedarían en casa por problemas de salud se arriesgan a ir a trabajar durante este tiempo como trabajadores esenciales. El cuidado de niños para las familias debido al cierre de escuelas es otro aspecto preocupante, ya que las familias pueden haber perdido opciones asequibles, viables y seguras para el cuidado de sus niños. Las realidades de la inestabilidad financiera, el aumento del estrés y la ansiedad durante este tiempo también pueden contribuir a un aumento en los casos de violencia doméstica y explotación laboral.

A estos desafíos se suma el miedo a la aplicación de las leyes de inmigración que puede disuadir a alguien de buscar la atención médica necesaria, o hablar sobre formas de abusos en el hogar o el lugar de trabajo recurrentes durante este tiempo.

Debido a estas muchas y graves preocupaciones para esta comunidad, instamos a nuestros líderes políticos y legisladores de políticas a considerar las realidades y las necesidades emergentes y apremiantes de las comunidades de trabajadores agrícolas en todo el país durante este tiempo del brote de coronavirus. Para vencer al virus, nadie debe quedar fuera. El virus COVID-19 nos enseña que somos una sola familia humana, dice el Santo Padre. ‘Solo podemos salir de esta situación juntos, como una humanidad entera’.

A pesar de estas preocupaciones, hay signos de esperanza en la industria agrícola en todo el país. Muchos productores y agricultores están haciendo todo lo posible para proteger a sus trabajadores y garantizar que se comuniquen e implementen pautas y medidas de sensibilización y distanciamiento social. Extendemos nuestro sincero agradecimiento a estas empresas e imploramos que esta tendencia se ejecute en todo el país para la protección básica, la seguridad y el bienestar de todos los trabajadores agrícolas y sus familias.

Ofrecemos las siguientes recomendaciones:
• Reconocer que todos los trabajadores necesitan acceso a pruebas gratuitas y atención relacionada con el virus COVID-19.
• Asegurarse de que todas las viviendas y el transporte para los trabajadores agrícolas cumplan con las pautas actuales de los CDC.
• Proporcionar información sobre salud e higiene adecuadas que sea fácilmente accesible en múltiples idiomas e infografías para trabajadores analfabetos.
• Asegurar el acceso a la higiene adecuada y protecciones de seguridad en los sitios de trabajo, incluidas las áreas para el lavado de manos, máscaras y otros equipos de protección personal.
• Tener establecido un plan de salud de emergencia en el lugar para garantizar la atención y los protocolos cuando un trabajador contrae el virus COVID-19; y
• Honrar la dignidad del trabajo de los trabajadores agrícolas y asegurarse de que se les pague un salario digno, así como ser elegibles para otros beneficios para ayudar a proteger su salud y la salud y seguridad de sus familias en este momento.

Oramos por todos los trabajadores agrícolas que enfrentan dificultades y desafíos relacionados o agravados por el virus COVID-19. Oramos por su protección y seguridad, ya que ellos contribuyen con la satisfacción de las necesidades del país; oramos por todos los trabajadores actualmente desempleados, para que el Señor los acompañe y los proteja. Durante este momento desafiante, es bueno recordar las palabras de San Juan Pablo II: ‘Somos el pueblo de la Pascua, y Aleluya es nuestra canción’. Que el Señor resucitado envíe su paz y gracia para estar con ustedes y sus familias. Nos dirigimos a Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe, pidiéndole su intercesión y protección materna para el fin del coronavirus".

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Palabras clave: Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de Estados Unidos, USCCB, Arzobispo Nelson J. Pérez, Comité de Diversidad Cultural en la Iglesia, Obispo Mario E. Dorsonville, Comité de Migración, Obispo Joseph J. Tyson, Subcomité de Cuidado Pastoral de Migrantes, Refugiados y Viajeros, Obispo Oscar Cantú, Ministerio de Trabajadores Agrícolas Migrantes, Coronavirus, COVID-19, pandemia

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Contactos de prensa:
Chieko Noguchi o Miguel Guilarte
202-541-3200

 

Líderes católicos responden a la suspensión de la inmigración anunciada por la Administración con un llamado a la unidad en el esfuerzo por combatir COVID-19

Thu, 04/23/2020 - 14:21

WASHINGTON – En respuesta a la proclamación del presidente Trump que anunció un alto temporal a la inmigración, el arzobispo José H. Gomez, de Los Ángeles, presidente de la Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de Estados Unidos (USCCB), el obispo Mario E. Dorsonville, obispo auxiliar de Washington y presidente del Comité de Migración de la USCCB, y el Obispo Jaime Soto, de Sacramento, y presidente de la Junta de Directores de la Red Católica de Inmigración Legal, Inc. (CLINIC), emitieron la siguiente respuesta:

“En este momento, nuestra humanidad común es más evidente que nunca. El virus es despiadado al aprovecharse de la vida humana; no conoce fronteras ni nacionalidad. El Papa Francisco nos enseña que para vivir estos tiempos necesitamos emplear y encarnar la ‘creatividad del amor’. Por el contrario, esta acción del presidente amenaza con alimentar la polarización y la animosidad. Si bien recibimos con agrado los esfuerzos para garantizar que todos los estadounidenses sean reconocidos por la dignidad de su trabajo, la crisis global causada por COVID-19 exige la unidad y la creatividad del amor, no más división e indiferencia de una mentalidad desechable. Hay poca evidencia de que los inmigrantes le quiten trabajos a los ciudadanos. Inmigrantes y ciudadanos juntos son socios para revivir la economía de la nación. Siempre debemos recordar que todos somos hijos e hijas de Dios unidos como una sola familia humana.

Estamos extremadamente preocupados al ver cómo esta proclamación impactará a las familias inmigrantes que buscan reunificarse, así como a los trabajadores religiosos. La decisión evita que ciertos familiares de inmigrantes se reúnan con sus seres queridos que viven en Estados Unidos. Además, prohíbe a los trabajadores religiosos que buscan venir a Estados Unidos, como residentes permanentes legales, apoyar el trabajo de nuestra Iglesia, así como de muchas otras religiones, en este momento. Sin duda, esto perjudicará a la Iglesia Católica y a otras denominaciones en Estados Unidos, disminuyendo su capacidad general para ministrar a los necesitados".

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Palabras clave: Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de Estados Unidos USCCB, Arzobispo José H. Gomez, Obispo Mario E. Dorsonville, Obispo Jaime Soto, Presidente Trump, Migrantes, Inmigración.

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Contactos de prensa:
Chieko Noguchi o Miguel Guilarte
202-541-3200

 

 

Obispos Católicos de Estados Unidos y Canadá buscan la intercesión de María, Madre de la Iglesia, por fortaleza en la lucha contra el COVID-19

Thu, 04/23/2020 - 12:48

WASHINGTON – Mientras que el mundo continúa enfrentando los efectos continuos de la pandemia mundial del coronavirus, el arzobispo José H. Gomez, de Los Ángeles y presidente de la Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de Estados Unidos (USCCB) anunció que los obispos de este país se unirán a la Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de Canadá el 1 de mayo para renovar la consagración de las dos naciones al cuidado de nuestra Santísima Madre.

A través de una dedicación colectiva o un encargo de una nación a María, un acto de consagración debe ser un recordatorio para los fieles del testimonio del Evangelio de la Santísima Madre para pedir su intercesión efectiva ante su Hijo en nombre de los necesitados.

El obispo John Carroll de Baltimore, el primer obispo de Estados Unidos, promovió la devoción a María, la Madre de Dios, y colocó a Estados Unidos bajo su protección en una carta pastoral en 1792.

Los veintiún obispos que asistieron al Sexto Consejo Provincial de Baltimore en 1846 decidieron nombrar a la Santísima Virgen María, bajo el título de Inmaculada Concepción, como la Patrona de Estados Unidos, y el Papa Pío IX aprobó esta decisión al año siguiente. Más recientemente, la dedicación del Santuario Nacional de la Inmaculada Concepción en Washington, DC, en 1959, fue la oportunidad para que los obispos consagraran una vez más la nación a la Santísima Madre. Varios papas también han consagrado el mundo a María en varias ocasiones.

La consagración del 1 de mayo ocurrirá después de una acción similar del Consejo Episcopal Latinoamericano (CELAM) que consagró sus naciones a Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe el domingo de Pascua. La renovación de la consagración prevista en este país para el 1 de mayo no cambia la designación de María como Patrona de Estados Unidos bajo el título de la Inmaculada Concepción. Más bien, esta oración reafirma y renueva las encomiendas marianas anteriores, y nos une en solidaridad con nuestro Santo Padre, quien recientemente estableció el Memorial de la Bienaventurada Virgen María, Madre de la Iglesia, como fuente de protección y fortaleza.

"Esto le dará a la Iglesia la oportunidad de orar por la protección continua de Nuestra Señora de los vulnerables, la curación de los enfermos y la sabiduría de aquellos que trabajan para curar este terrible virus", dijo el arzobispo Gómez en una carta dirigida a los obispos de Estados Unidos. Cada año, la Iglesia busca la intercesión especial de la Madre de Dios durante el mes de mayo. "Este año, buscamos la asistencia de Nuestra Señora aún más fervientemente mientras enfrentamos juntos los efectos de la pandemia global", continuó.

El arzobispo Gómez dirigirá una breve liturgia con la oración de reconsagración el viernes 1 de mayo a las 3:00pm, hora del este de Estados Unidos, y ha invitado a los obispos a unirse desde sus respectivas diócesis y les ha pedido que extiendan la invitación a los fieles en sus diócesis para su participación. Una guía de liturgia estará disponible para ayudar a los fieles que podrán unirse a través de las plataformas de redes sociales de la USCCB: Facebook, Twitter e Instagram.

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Palabras clave: Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de Estados Unidos, USCCB, arzobispo José H. Gomez, Canadá, Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de Canadá, María Madre de la Iglesia, Patrona de Estados Unidos, Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe.

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Contactos de prensa:
Chieko Noguchi o Miguel Guilarte
202-541-3200

 

Catholic Leaders Respond to Administration’s Halt to Immigration with a Call for Unity in the Effort to Overcome COVID-19

Thu, 04/23/2020 - 12:00
Catholic Leaders Respond to Administration’s Halt to Immigration with a Call for Unity in the Effort to Overcome COVID-19 Brian Salamanca Thu, 04/23/2020 - 12:00 WASHINGTON - Responding to the proclamation signed by President Trump announcing a temporary reviewable immigration halt, Archbishop José H. Gomez of Los Angeles, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), Bishop Mario E. Dorsonville, auxiliary bishop of Washington and chairman of the USCCB’s Committee on Migration, and Bishop Jaime Soto of Sacramento and chair of the Board of Directors of the Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC), issued the following response: “In this moment, our common humanity is apparent more now than ever. The virus is merciless in its preying upon human life; it knows no borders or nationality. Pope Francis teaches us that to live through these times we need to employ and embody the 'creativity of love.' The President’s action threatens instead to fuel polarization and animosity. While we welcome efforts to ensure that all Americans are recognized for the dignity of their work, the global crisis caused by COVID-19 demands unity and the creativity of love, not more division and the indifference of a throw-away mentality. There is little evidence that immigrants take away jobs from citizens. Immigrants and citizens together are partners in reviving the nation’s economy. We must always remember that we are all sons and daughters of God joined together as one human family. “We are extremely concerned about how the proclamation will impact immigrant families looking to reunify, as well as religious workers. The proclamation prevents certain immigrant family members from reuniting with their loved ones living in the United States. Additionally, it bars religious workers seeking to come to the United States as lawful permanent residents from supporting the work of our Church, as well as many other religions, at this time. This will undoubtedly hurt the Catholic Church and other denominations in the United States, diminishing their overall ability to minister to those in need.” ### Media Contacts: Chieko Noguchi or Miguel Guilarte 202-541-3200  

U.S. and Canadian Catholic Bishops to Seek Intercession of Mary, Mother of the Church, for Strength in Struggle Against COVID-19

Thu, 04/23/2020 - 12:00
U.S. and Canadian Catholic Bishops to Seek Intercession of Mary, Mother of the Church, for Strength in Struggle Against COVID-19 Brian Salamanca Thu, 04/23/2020 - 12:00 WASHINGTON – As the world continues to face the ongoing effects of the global pandemic of the coronavirus, Archbishop José H. Gomez of Los Angeles and president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) has announced that the U.S. bishops will join the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops on May 1 in renewing the consecrations of the two nations to the care of our Blessed Mother. Through a collective dedication or entrustment of a nation to Mary, an act of consecration is meant to be a reminder to the faithful of the Blessed Mother’s witness to the Gospel and to ask for her effective intercession before her Son on behalf of those in need. Bishop John Carroll of Baltimore, the first bishop of the United States, promoted devotion to Mary, the Mother of God, and placed the United States under her protection in a pastoral letter of 1792. The twenty-one bishops attending the Sixth Provincial Council of Baltimore in 1846 determined to name the Blessed Virgin Mary, under the title of the Immaculate Conception, as the Patroness of the United States, and Pope Pius IX approved this decision the following year. More recently, the dedication of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C. in 1959 was the opportunity for the bishops to once again consecrate the nation to the Blessed Mother. Several popes have likewise consecrated the world to Mary on various occasions. The consecration on May 1 follows a similar action of the bishops’ conference of Latin America and the Caribbean (CELAM) who consecrated their nations to Our Lady of Guadalupe on Easter Sunday. The renewal of consecration planned in this country for May 1 does not change the designation of Mary as the Patroness of the United States under the title of the Immaculate Conception. Rather, this prayer reaffirms and renews previous Marian entrustments, and unites us in solidarity with our Holy Father, who recently established the Memorial of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of the Church, as a source of protection and strength. “This will give the Church the occasion to pray for Our Lady’s continued protection of the vulnerable, healing of the unwell, and wisdom for those who work to cure this terrible virus,” said Archbishop Gomez in a letter to the U.S. bishops. Each year, the Church seeks the special intercession of the Mother of God during the month of May. “This year, we seek the assistance of Our Lady all the more earnestly as we face together the effects of the global pandemic,” he continued. Archbishop Gomez will lead a brief liturgy with the prayer of re-consecration on Friday, May 1 at 3:00 pm EDT and has invited the bishops to join in from their respective dioceses and asked them to extend the invitation to the faithful in their dioceses for their participation. A liturgy guide will be available to assist the faithful who may join in by tuning into the USCCB’s social media platforms: Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. ### Media Contacts: Chieko Noguchi or Miguel Guilarte 202-541-3200